The Beatles Make Music Matter

The Beatles Make Music Matter

 

The Beatles were responsible for the global explosion of pop music
culture in the 60s and today have joined grassroots campaign Music
Matters. Alongside artists such as Elbow, Bernard Butler Paloma Faith,
Kate Bush and many more, The Beatles are showing their support to a
campaign that seeks to engage music fans directly, highlighting the
value of music and raising awareness of legitimate online music services.

The Beatles have pledged their support by approving the
creation of a special animated film, in-keeping with the campaign to
date. The film was animated and directed by Lee Gingold who has used
their timeless recordings to provide the soundtrack to the life of the
films’ central character - how he grew up listening to their
music and how it has marked the various milestones in his life, the
trials and tribulations, the passion, the story behind the music. The
film focuses on the message that music is a shared experience and as
such brings us all together, and for him that’s why music matters.

Watch the video by clicking here

The Beatles have inspired thousands of artists over the years
and they’re a band that almost everyone can connect to. Their
endorsement of this campaign is an important milestone for Music Matters.

On the campaign website at www.whymusicmatters.org there are a number of already well received films from artists such as
Blind Willie Johnson, The Jam, John Martyn, Nick Cave, Sigur Ros, Kate
Bush and The Fron Choir, and most recently Elbow, Bernard Butler and
Paloma Faith.  The Beatles are the latest artists to have worked
with animators to create an exclusive short film to raise the
awareness of all the ways to consume music responsibly.  If there
wasn’t a sustainable system in place through the sale of music,
that supported and allowed people to have a career, arguably we may
never have had The Beatles - we need to continue to support new
artists who in turn continue to influence the global superstars of today.

The Music Matters campaign was first launched in March 2010 as
a credible artist driven campaign. In its first year it has attracted
unanimous support from all sectors of the music industry –
managers, all four major record labels (Universal, Sony, Warners and
EMI) and independents, publishers and retailers as well as some of the
worlds most loved artists. In recent times technological advances mean
that music is more readily available and accessible than ever before.
Music Matters aims to start a conversation to get people thinking
about how valuable music is, where they get their music from and
through this make the right ethical choices when consuming music.

This phase of Music Matters will significantly ramp up online
consumer engagement over the next twelve months, asking music fans to
directly get involved and pledge their support. Music Matters is also
encouraging artists - both established and emerging - to contribute
videos and commentary about the enduring value of music and what it
means to them.

The high level of support from the industry was emphasised by
the acknowledgements that the campaign received at The Brit Awards
2011 with artists such as Cee Lo Green, Ellie Goulding, Dizzie Rascal
and Simon Le Bon voicing their support.

UK Music retailers remain key partners in the campaign, with
Music Matters placing renewed focus on the Music Matters Trust Mark
that helps consumers to identify legitimate sources of music.

Music Matters is supported by all those who work in and around
music. A steering committee reflective of the support it has gained
from all sectors of the industry has been set up to execute the
campaign.
 

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